Health Infrastructure

In Canada, essential infrastructure, such as food production facilities, water management, energy production, storm sewers, homes and hospitals, is often designed and constructed according to the meteorological conditions which existed before the advent of climate change. As such, their inability to cope with conditions outside of their design specifications can lead to risks to the health of the population.

Case Studies

Explore case studies to learn about how data was used to impact climate related decisions in specific contexts.

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Variables related to Health Infrastructure

Explore variables to learn about how data was used to impact climate related decisions in specific contexts.

Days with Tmax > 25°C describes the number of days where the daytime high temperature is warmer than 25°C. This index gives an indication of number of summer days in the selected time period.

High temperatures are important. They determine if plants and animals can thrive, they limit or enable outdoor activities, define how we design our buildings and vehicles, and shape our transportation and energy use. However, when temperatures are very hot, people – especially the elderly – are much more likely to suffer from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Many outdoor activities become dangerous or impossible in very high temperatures.

Technical description:

The number of days with a maximum temperature (Tmax) greater than 25°C. Use the Variable menu option to view annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index.


Days with Tmax > 27°C describes the number of days where the daytime high temperature is warmer than 27°C.

High temperatures are important. They determine if plants and animals can thrive, they limit or enable outdoor activities, define how we design our buildings and vehicles, and shape our transportation and energy use. However, when temperatures are very hot, people – especially the elderly – are much more likely to suffer from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Many outdoor activities become dangerous or impossible in very high temperatures.

Technical description:

The number of days with a maximum temperature (Tmax) greater than 27°C. Use the Variable menu option to view annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index.


Days with Tmax > 29°C describes the number of days where the daytime high temperature is warmer than 29°C.

High temperatures are important. They determine if plants and animals can thrive, they limit or enable outdoor activities, define how we design our buildings and vehicles, and shape our transportation and energy use. However, when temperatures are very hot, people – especially the elderly – are much more likely to suffer from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Many outdoor activities become dangerous or impossible in very high temperatures.

Technical description:

The number of days with a maximum temperature (Tmax) greater than 29°C. Use the Variable menu option to view annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index.


Days with Tmax > 30°C describes the number of days where the daytime high temperature is warmer than 30°C. This index gives an indication of number of hot days in the selected time period.

High temperatures are important. They determine if plants and animals can thrive, they limit or enable outdoor activities, define how we design our buildings and vehicles, and shape our transportation and energy use. However, when temperatures are very hot, people – especially the elderly – are much more likely to suffer from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Many outdoor activities become dangerous or impossible in very high temperatures.

Technical description:

The number of days with a maximum temperature (Tmax) greater than 30°C. Use the Variable menu option to view annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index.


Days with Tmax > 32°C describes the number of days where the daytime high temperature is warmer than 32°C. This index gives an indication of number of very hot days in the selected time period.

High temperatures are important. They determine if plants and animals can thrive, they limit or enable outdoor activities, define how we design our buildings and vehicles, and shape our transportation and energy use. However, when temperatures are very hot, people – especially the elderly – are much more likely to suffer from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Many outdoor activities become dangerous or impossible in very high temperatures.

Technical description:

The number of days with a maximum temperature (Tmax) greater than 32°C. Use the Variable menu option to view annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index.


Wet Days >20mm describes the number of days where more than 20 mm of precipitation (rain and snow combined) falls in the selected time period.

Adequate precipitation is crucial to water availability, agriculture, electricity generation and wildfire suppression.

Technical description:

The number of days with precipitation > 20 mm. Use the Variable menu option to view the annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index.


Heating degree days (HDDs) give an indication of the amount of space heating (e.g., from a gas boiler/furnace, baseboard electric heating or fireplace) that may be required to maintain comfortable conditions inside a building during cooler months. When the daily average temperature is colder than the threshold temperature, HDDs are accumulated (see Degree Days Below). Threshold values may vary, but 17°C or 18°C are commonly used in Canada. Larger HDD values indicate a greater need for space heating.

Technical description:

The number of degree days accumulated below 17°C in the selected time period. Use the Variable menu option to view the annual, monthly or seasonal values for this index. Visit the Analyze page to calculate degree days using different threshold temperatures.